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Master Of Malts
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 09, 2017 10:13 am    Post subject: waste whisky Reply with quote

http://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BBDWkLj.img?h=486&w=728&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=898&y=364
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Master Of Malts
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 09, 2017 10:20 am    Post subject: waste whisky Reply with quote

The world’s first car to be powered by fuel produced from whisky waste has completed its first public demonstration drive in Scotland. The sustainable fuel is called biobutanol and the Scottish whisky industry could potentially produce millions of litres of it every year. 
A Ford Focus hired from car dealer group Arnold Clark was used for the inaugural run, which took place at Edinburgh Napier university. Arnold Clark technicians certified the biofuel for use before the drive: no engine modifications were required. 
Related: Petrol and diesel cars to be banned in France (Fortune)











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Developed by startup firm Celtic Renewables in association with Perthshire’s Tullibardine Distillery, the biobutanol fuel is produced from draff and pot ale. Draff is sugar-rich kernels of barley, soaked in water, which aids whisky fermentation, while pot ale is copper-rich yeasty liquid left over following distillation. 
Scotland’s malt whisky industry produces almost 750,000 tonnes of draff and a staggering 2 billion litres of pot ale per year, whisky residue that would otherwise go to waste. This is why Celtic Renewables is so confident it could potentially produce biobutanol in such quantities. 

© Provided by Motoring Research Whisky residue biofuel car
Founder and president Professor Martin Tangney said it could be “a multi-billion-pound global business with the opportunity to turn transport green.” Tullibardine distillery manager John Torrance said it was immediately clear there was “game-changing potential of a new fuel created from our by-products.
“We’re a forward-thinking distillery and we’re happy to support what promises to be a groundbreaking first for renewable energy, for transport and for the Scottish whisky industry alike.”
The next step in the project is to secure sufficient funding to open a demonstrator plant in Grangemouth, with the potential to produce biobutanol biofuel on a much larger scale. 
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Master Of Malts
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 09, 2017 10:21 am    Post subject: waste whisky Reply with quote

hopefully got it better the second time around



richard
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bluepeter
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds interesting.

I note that the car required no modification. Was it a petrol, diesel or LPG model, though?

Presumably the waste material used as a basis would need some treatment, implying a cost. I wonder how much it'd cost to buy the fuel? I guess that that will depend largely on political considerations - I.e., the level of duty/taxes imposed - as well as the actual production and distribution costs.

I also wonder whether there are relevant environmental considerations. Bioethanol, for example, sounds wonderful as a fuel - until you realise that it takes a massive amount of land away from food production if it's to be commercially viable.

I'm not really expecting anyone here to answer these questions. I know that I can do my own research if I care enough. They're just my first thoughts.
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Genuine Risk
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only thing I will say is that draff is basically not available to farmers in Ayrshire anymore apart from the odd load. It is all going into AD plants such as the one at Girvan.

Its a great story but they are trying to find a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.
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JJTrav
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Considering the rising prices of risky and demand outstripping supply, is it ever going to be economical to use whisky for this purpose? I doubt it.
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bluepeter
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JJTrav wrote:
Considering the rising prices of risky and demand outstripping supply, is it ever going to be economical to use whisky for this purpose? I doubt it.


It's a possible alternative to fossil fuel. So it depends on supply and demand for that. Supply is falling or about to fall - fossil fuel is running out. I've no idea of the size of the market for vehicle fuel, let alone the quantity of this alternative that could theoretically be produced. And that assumes that the raw material would actually be available - I note Genuine Risk's suggestion that it might not be.

On the other hand, maybe the market for fossil fuel is beginning to taper off as well. Hybrid cars are beginning to become more widely available (in this context, note Volvo's recent announcement), and they're a stepping stone to wholly electric cars. Of course, the electricity has to be generated somehow. Maybe biobutanol (if it takes off) could be used for that. But electricity from other renewable sources, such as windpower, already has a head start. And gas from renewable sources (by anearobic digestion) has, too.

The economics of this process warrant close study. It may well prove uneconomic. But the idea appears to have come from a business, not the purely academic environment, so presumably there's someone who thinks that they can make a go of it.
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bluepeter
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 7:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It seems that there's another factor involved in the economics of this. I saw this BBC News article this morning http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-40599491 .

It gives a little more context: "While the European Union has mandated that 10% of transport fuels should come from sustainable sources by 2020, these biofuels have been a slow burner in the UK. Suppliers are already blending up to 4.75% of diesel and petrol with greener fuel, but doubling this amount will take up to 10 years say the authors of this new report, that was commissioned by the government."

So there's a political motivation pushing for more biofuels. In effect, then, this means that the biobutanol described is competing only with other sustainable fuels, and not with fossil fuels at all.

Of course, Brexit might screw that up...
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