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The Value of Sharing

 
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How much would you pay for a 70cl share in a cask?
<£45
33%
 33%  [ 37 ]
£45 - £54.99
9%
 9%  [ 10 ]
£55 - £64.99
2%
 2%  [ 3 ]
£65 - £69.99
0%
 0%  [ 1 ]
£70 - £74.99
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
£75 - £85
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
>£85
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Not interested / Couldn't wait that long for a dram
53%
 53%  [ 59 ]
Total Votes : 110

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angloshot
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 2:16 pm    Post subject: The Value of Sharing Reply with quote

A friend-of-a-friend has bought a cask from a distillery whose Whisky you have always enjoyed. The cask is of good quality, and has just been filled. How exciting!
There's a lot, and he's forked out a fortune for it. It will be stored at the distillery, and he plans to have it bottled, cask strength, 18 years from now. Obviously this will be a rare single cask, the distillery doesn't usually sell at cask strength either, and usually sells 15yo and 20yo expressions.
If you buy a 70cl share from him now, it will be delivered to your door in 18 years, tax and duty paid etc. You may want a couple, or perhaps you would buy one for a friend/relative (a good Christening present, surely!).
So, how much will you pay for a one-bottle share in this cask?
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albo
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Joined: 22 Mar 2011
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It depends on a number of factors.

What is the cask? Ex Bourbon, Ex Sherry? (could it be sulphured) It is a first fill or a refill? (what was the last turn out from that cask like) How much has he paid for it? What is the distillery?

Any and all of the above as a starting point would have an impact on the amount Id be prepared to pay.

Though as a starting point between £50 and £70 I'd say.
I'd be interested in so far as single cask bottles interest me, but being a member of the SMWS, I can buy single cask bottles that I;ve tried and I know I like without risk, this would be a risk.

I'd more than likley just take the 1 bottle, that way if it's not to my taste I've not spent too much. Id be reluctant to give a present to somone if I hadn't tried it or know they would like it.

The only other thing that may interest me in all this, is if the cask was filled on a certain day, for example my son's actual day of birth, I'd buy a few bottles of that if that were the case, it would be an excellent gift for his 18th, for him, his grandfathers (assuming they are still heathly and able to enjoy whisky at that point) myself and other familyt members.

Overall too little info in your post to give you an real answer.

Is this something that has happened to you? Or are you think of being the person who buys the cask? Or just deamed this up after a new years drinking session?
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angloshot
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, I should provide a bit more background, as I'm new here!
Unfortunately, this is not a marketing exercise, just to settle a good old fashioned pub argument.

Also, if you had a cask, at what age would you bottle it? Or would you base it on an annual tasting?
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albo
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok to settle an argument.

I'd still stick to the £50 - £70 range for a bottle at 18 years old, if it's from a distillery thats particularly desired (Port Ellen for example) then possibly more than that.

If it were me, I'd want to leave it in the cask as long as possible, I understand the desire to get your hands on it as soon as possible and this bottle it at 10 years, but I'd be leaving it pas the 18 years and push it out to 25 to 30 years, that way you are getting something very very different and possibly very special, of course that comes with it's own problem of having to keep on top of it to make sure it doesn't get too woody, so yearly tasting is a must Top Malt

So for an 18yr old £50 - £70
For a 25 - 30yr old £100 - £150

Id leave it for as long as possible.

Welcome to the forum by the way, always nice to have someone new to join the debate. Have a good new year.
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angloshot
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 3:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that Albo, very interesting.
So it turns out, we were all wrong. I had suggested that people would pay £60-70 for a share, whereas one friend argued that a share was less valuable than a bottle. I suppose there's some truth in that given all of the unknowns involved, but I still think a share in a cask would be quite a special possession.
Although I did think people would be less patient. I can understand paying >£100 for a rare single cask, but personally I'd rather buy the bottle than wait 25+ years for it!
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albo
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think its a case of right and wrong, all personal opinion and mine likes your and that of your friend will differ.

I quite agree that a share in something like this would be quite special, the reason I'm all for waiting is, I can go to a whisky shop anywhere and pick up a number of 10, 12, 15, 18 year old whisky as and when I want at a price that fits, the one thing I can't do is have an involvement in nurturing my own cask and having a bottle of something that I know the very origins of and that is only available to people from possibly my immediate social circle, so making something like that something as rare as a 30yr old cask makes it that much better and worth waiting for.
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Quaich1
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Joined: 21 Apr 2012
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Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To be young again.... Very Happy

Trouble is in 18 years, I wouldn't hear the delivery man at the door or by the time I answered the door I would have long forgotten all about the bottle I ordered when I had retired and thought it was a good idea at the time. I probably would have switched to a liquid diet of warm milk by that time (sure hope not). It's a good deal for folks now in the 20-40 year old range not for the old codgers like me, though I'm a younger old codger to be more to the point. If I went for the deal, I would be just turning 80 when it would be ready; an awful lot of hard Canadian winters in 18 years.

Laughing
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James T
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really wouldnt be interested in waiting that long for a dram. Like Quaich1, i plan on being around in 18 years time but who knows. Life is for living now. If i was younger it would have to be a from a favourite distillery before i would be tempted and even then it would be quite a risk so i wouldnt be willing to pay much.
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Big Mac
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wouldnt be interested in waiting that long to get my hands on a bottle unless it was from a distillery i particularly like such as the Macallan, even then i wouldnt pay too much without getting the chance to sample it or read a few reviews from people i would trust. As far as when a private cask should be bottled, i would say that i would base it on tasting and also consider the additional storage/warehousing costs.
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